The Kombucha experiment – Part I

As usual, I’m a couple of years behind the trend. Kombucha is a drink that was extremely fashionable a few years ago but it still has a solid following. It is a tea drink that is made by fermenting sweetened black tea with a culture of yeasts and bacteria. It is also known as Tea Kvass (Russia), Hongchajun (China) and Kocha Kinoko (Japan). Confusingly, in Japan, Kombucha refers to seaweed that is powdered to produce kelp-tea. The two “kombucha” are very different.

Many websites talk about  probiotics and the detoxification and immune boosting properties of Kombucha (see notes on health at the end of article) but it also happens to be a very tasty drink that is naturally carbonated.

DBKB KombuchaWe are lucky in Dublin to have a local, organic, non-flavoured, Kombucha “brewery”. This is a very convenient option especially if you are short on time but I’ve never been one to take the easy route so I decided to experiment and try brewing my own.

A SCOBY (Symbiotic Culture of Bacteria and Yeast) is needed to prepare Kombucha.  The SCOBY is sometimes called a mushroom but it’s just a colony of bacteria and yeast – no fungus. I’ve looked at lots of websites with instructions on how to brew Kombucha and almost all of them say that you start with a SCOBY. I was having some trouble locating a SCOBY but then I came across an article that said you could grow your own SCOBY so I decided to try that. I don’t know how this is going to turn out- we have to wait for two weeks to see if it works or not but here were my steps for preparation.

Kombucha IngredientsI brewed 500ml of tea. I would have preferred to use an organic black tea but I had none so I used a regular Panyong Golden Needle. I left it to steep for 10 mins and then removed the tea leaves, added 1 tsp. of sugar and allowed it to cool for 30 mins. I have since read that heat can be very destructive to the whole scoby-growing process and at 30 minutes it was still warm so this could be a problem. Leaving it for an hour would be a safer bet.

After 30 minutes I added 330ml of raw Kombucha (I used DBKB).   After adding the Kombucha I covered the bowl with a tea towel and put it in a warm dry place. I used a glass bowl because apparantly the acidity of the tea can cause it to absorb harmful elements from containers that are painted, ceramic etc (there has been two reported incidences of lead poisoning where Kombucha tea was brewed in a ceramic pot).

And now I have to wait for 2-3 weeks….

Health Note: Since the early 19th century, Kombucha tea has been promoted as an immunity-boosting tea that can strengthen the body and prevent many ailments. There is no solid scientific evidence to support the health claims of Kombucha tea.  In addition, there are potential health risks from Kombucha (source) but these equally, are not backed by solid scientific research. Because of the potential health risks, people with an immune deficiency or any other medical condition should seek medical advice before drinking the tea. Women who are pregnant or breast-feeding should not use this tea.