Ode to my Bodum cup

The Bodum Tea for One

The Bodum Tea for One (Source)

Ok, I can’t write an ode but I do love this cup and I only realised how much when I tried replacing it. I don’t use this cup for preparing real tea at all but the Bodum “tea for one” is perfect for herbal teas.

Things I love about this cup:

  • It is double-walled with a vacuum between the walls so it keeps the liquid inside hot (especially with the lid on)
  • The double wall means that the outside doesn’t get too hot to handle
  • It came with the brew basket which has a mesh that is fine enough to prevent even small particles getting through (handy for when you grind herbs)
  • Some herbal teas need to have their vapours contained in order to maximise benefits and the lid is perfect for that.
  • The size of the brew basket means that bulky herbs are not a problem
  • The glass cup allows me to gauge how strong the tea is
  • The lid doubles as a saucer for the brew basket to stop it dripping
  • It doesn’t have a handle – weird I know, but I like that it doesn’t have a handle. It’s more symmetrical.
  • I’ve had this for over five years, use it three or four times a week and it is still not broken or chipped.
  • It is easy to clean. I’ve always hand-washed mine but it is dishwasher safe.
  • It is a good size for herbal teas (350ml)
  • The brew basket doesn’t absorb the flavour of the tea so you don’t get the flavour of the last herb that was prepared in it.
Yo-Yo Set

Yo-Yo Set (Source)

The “tea for one” is no longer available on the Bodum website and seems to be replaced with the Yo-Yo set. It looked like it might do the trick but it didn’t. It is not double walled and the lid is smaller than the cup so there are gaps all around that let out heat and vapours. A more minor issue is the handle. It just looks wrong but I would get over that if it were not for the other two problems. I foresee a bleak future for this cup at the back of the top shelf.

The situation is not completely hopeless. I can still buy the double-walled glasses on their own and try to find a brew basket and lid that fits them afterwards. In the mean time though, after five years of taking my bodum cup and strainer for granted, I’m now afraid to use it in case I break it.

 

Steeping tea

I realise that my last post where I describe the preparation of Tieguanyin was probably confusing (my readership of two lodged their complaints!) so I’m going to try to clear things up today. The preparation of tea is called steeping and involves soaking the tea leaves in water to extract the flavour.

Yellow teapot

Traditional style teapot used here in Ireland

Here in Ireland (and in all Western countries that I have been to) steeping involves putting tea leaves (or tea bag) into a large teapot and then adding in boiling water. The tea is served from the teapot into cups after around two minutes if you like ‘weak’ tea and or after several minutes if you like ‘strong’ tea. After about five minutes, the tea leaves and the liquid need to be separated or it will over-steep and becomes bitter. If this happens, it is usually addressed by either adding more water to dilute or starting over and making a ‘fresh pot’. I’ve seen variations on this process where people add the tea leaves, add the water and then heat up the teapot on a gas hob. The teabag-in-a-cup is a another variation – the teabag  is put in the cup, water is added and the teabag is removed and discarded once the tea looks strong enough.  There are lots of variations but the basic process is consistent – the flavour of the tea is extracted by steeping the tea once (i.e single steeping).

Yixing Clay Teapot [Source]

Yixing clay teapot [Source]

However, in China, Taiwan and other parts of Asia, there is a different way to prepare good quality tea that involves several short steepings rather than one long steeping. To do this we add the tea to the teapot (usually a very small teapot) and add the water but instead of steeping for ~five minutes, we steep for maybe 30 seconds (it depends on the tea). After the 30 seconds, we separate completely the leaves and the water by pouring off all the tea from the tea pot into cups. It may seem like a short time at first but don’t worry, it works. When we are ready for more tea, we re-steep the tea by adding water to the teapot again (with the same leaves). This time we will wait a little longer – maybe 40 seconds before pouring off all the tea. This is the second steeping and will taste and look different to the first steeping. We can repeat this several times, increasing the duration of steeping each time. During each steeping the water opens the leaf a little more and the colour, smell and taste of the tea will vary. Eventually, it will start to loose taste and colour and then we know to stop. Using this method we get smaller cups of tea but more of them with a variety of flavours and the tea does not over-steep. It is not unusual for a good quality Pu-erh to have ten steepings and it can go to 20 steepings or more.

Brew basket

Brew basket

The re-steeping technique does not need a teapot. The same result can be achieved if we put a brew basket in a cup, add the leaves and water and then wait thirty seconds before removing the brew basket. When we are finished drinking the first cup we put brew basket back in the cup, add water again and wait say 40 seconds for the second steeping. Again, this can continue for multiple steepings, increasing the duration with each steeping.

I hope that helps to clear up the difference between single-steeping and re-steeping. When I post about individual teas I’ll describe the steeping preparation that I’ve used, including timings. I have deliberately left out factors like water-type, temperature, rinsing, utensils and volume of tea. I’ll come back to those in future posts.With all that said, tea is meant to be enjoyed so don’t feel under pressure to prepare your tea a certain way. Experiment and see what you think!