Dolfin Earl Grey Chocolate

Earl Grey Chocolate

Dolfin Earl Grey Chocolate

I picked up this packet of Dolfin Earl Grey Chocolate in Belgium. Plenty of chocolatiers are making tea-flavoured chocolate but it’s still not that common to find here (apart from matcha Kit Kats!).

I’m definitely not an expert but buying chocolate in Belgium seemed like a safe bet. This is dark chocolate but only has 52% cocoa. On the positive side, the flavour of earl grey is subtle, it’s not overly sweet and the tea in the chocolate makes a natural crunch that is pleasant. The outer packaging is not bad either with its cute resealable envelope pouch. On the negative side, the chocolate is not smooth but grainy and doesn’t melt easily so I ended up chewing the chocolate. I found the quality of the chocolate too distracting to enjoy the taste and unusually (for me) the bar has been left untouched for several weeks. I think Earl Grey has the potential to go very well with dark chocolate but this Dolfin bar just didn’t pull it off.

Tea with food

food and teaThere will be plenty of eating going on over the next week or two and there are bound to be a few times when wine will need a substitute. Here are some of the basic guidlines on combining tea with food.

As a general rule, green tea is the savoury tea. Salt will bring out its flavour and crispness while sweet foods will bring out the astringency and bitterness. So vegetal green teas will go well with prawns, anchovies, other seafood and olives. It is better with light meats and snacks rather than greasy foods. Light salty crackers like water biscuits work well and especially crackers with thyme. Light rice-based dishes are also complemented by green tea.

Strong black tea (from Africa, India and Sri Lanka) goes very well with red meat and spicy dishes (especially peppers) but goes equally well with rich creamy deserts, cream cheeses, dark chocolate and nuts such as pecans. Tea with desert is quite common and black tea is ideal for deserts such as rich chocolate cake or pecan pie.

It seems a shame to eat food with oolong but if you must then lighter oolongs go well with seafood, salty crackers and walnuts. Salty crackers with rosemary go particularly well. Similar to green tea, lighter oolongs do not combine will with heavy foods that contain butter and fat. Dark roasted oolongs go well with rosemary, honey, pecan, almonds and cashew nuts.

In my opinion pu-ehr should not be drank with food but shou pu-ehr is very soothing after a heavy meal.

White tea doesn’t blend well with food but I’ve heard it can be used as a palate cleanser between courses instead of sorbet (I’ve never tried this).

For the tisanes, rooibos and honeybush have a natural hint of sweetness so they go well with pastries and chocolate. Christmas rooibos usually has cinnamon, spices and orange that complement fruit cake, pudding and mince pies.

Finally, fennel, peppermint, ginger and anise are all excellent for aiding digestion. Anise is sweet and spicy and calming for digestion at night time while fennel is particularly good after a heavy meals and for helping with heartburn. Fennel and ginger are also excellent for nausea.

Tea and Food Pairing

Micro Salad

Micro Salad (Source)

Last summer, I was lucky enough to meet one of the scientists behind molecular gastronomy, Hervé This. I also attended his session at the Euroscience Open Forum entitled “Science and the future of cuisine” where he (along with Mark Post and Bill Yosses) discussed molecular cuisine and the new trend in scientific cooking called note-by-note cuisine. The session was full of fascinating examples of this new cuisine but also covered the practicalities of sustaining the human race by “creating” vegetables and meat in the lab. It was an unforgettable session and tasting the chocolate mousse that was produced without cream or eggs sealed the deal!

In particular though, it drew my attention to the application of science for understanding taste and flavour so when I attended the World Tea Expo a few weeks ago, I was excited to hear Virginia Utermohlen (Cornell University) and Renée Senne talking about their scientific approach to pairing food with tea. Virginia started with the basics of taste and flavour and discussed how the chemicals in tea bind to receptors in our mouths and nose. The session then focussed on the effect that food has on the taste of tea – how some foods will mute the taste of tea while others will enhance it. I was expecting the session to be based around a molecular matching approach but Virginia’s approach was mostly based on trigeminal receptors (for heat and coolness). Cinnamon and mint were used to illustrate the power of these receptors. We were each given a cinnamon sweet which is considered to be “heat” on a taste/temperature scale so it gives a sense of warmth after binding to its receptors. After the taste had developed we took the sweet out of our mouth and replaced it with a mint. The “coolness” of the mint turns off the heat receptors and gives a sense of cold when it binds to its own receptors so the cinnamon taste was completely replaced with mint. After the mint was removed the heat receptors become active again and the heat of the cinnamon came back as residual cinnamon in the mouth was picked up.

Trigeminal Receptors

Thermal Nociceptors (Source)

From there, we went on to apply the model to Black (hot), Oolong (warm) and Green (cold) tea. The general premise was to use food of similar heat or coolness together to avoid unpleasant tastes and to allow the tea and the food to complement each other and enhance each others flavours. So Oolong (warm) could not be mixed with Cardamom (hot) because the hot spice would mute the taste of the warm drink. Crème fraiche going well with Mexican food is an example where flipping hot and cold can result in a positive effect. It makes sense to some extent but still didn’t clear up some of the well-known anomalies of molecular matching (e.g. strawberries clashing with black tea and sugar clashing with green tea). It is an interesting model to consider alongside other food pairing methods and certainly goes a long way to explaining why I like my chilli-chocolate with black tea.